When using a hardware keyboard with iOS 9, you can hold the Command key to view a cheat sheet of an app’s shortcuts (assuming its developer has updated to add some). But I noticed this morning that those shortcuts can be contextual, based on the task at hand or which panel or tab you are currently viewing.

The gallery I included here shows various cheat sheets from Tweetbot and Ulysses. Notice how they change based on whether I’m viewing my Twitter timeline or composing a tweet, or whether I’m at the top level of my Ulysses documents or have one selected.

The cheat sheet in iOS 9 makes keyboard shortcuts much more accessible on iOS versus a Mac. But this contextual aspect helps to break them down by task, allowing users to learn just the shortcuts they want. This is a clever feature, and I hope all developers take advantage of it.

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